Pura Beji Temple

Pura Beji Temple

The Pura Beji Temple is a large and beautiful temple complex in the village of Sangsit in North Bali, dating back to the 15th century, during the spread of the Majapahit kingdom from Java. The temple is revered by village farmers and is unique in Bali, in that it also serves as a ‘pura puseh’ or the village’s central temple. The temple adds to the checklist of historical landmarks that you can tick off on your sightseeing tours to Bali’s northern area.

Pura Beji Temple is located at Sangsit Village, Buleleng Regency, Only 8 km kilometer east of Singaraja, you will see an excellent example of the colorful architectural style of northern Bali. Beji Temple is a Subak temple, dedicated to the spirit that looks after the irrigation and rice fields. It’s about half a km from main road toward the coast. The temple is famous for its Barong architecture and virtuoso relief carvings. With its courtyards of clipped grass and old frangipani trees, it is a tranquil and refreshing place.

The grand gate separating the forecourt from the inner courtyard spreads almost the entire length of the wall and is wonderfully carved on both the inner and outer sides. The principal shrines have staircases and turrets, and one gets feeling here that worship has something to do with the sheer pleasure of building things. The temple is picturesque and full of ornamental carvings mostly in the form of rambling plants and floral motives as is the typical style of Buleleng. The most significant thing in this temple is that every surface has a carving so it is extremely artistic.

Moreover all of the carvings are painted thus making this colorful temple very unique. There is no clear evidence as to when this temple was built, but historians state that in was in the XV century during the Majapahit Kingdom period - centered in Java. As with other temples on Bali it is divided into three courtyards, the outer courtyard then the middle and inner courtyards. At the outer courtyard you will find two dragon statues that symbolize the temple guards and upon entering the temple you are advised to wear sarong and sash. Facilities at the temple are limited by way of parking and refreshments but it is usually always included in a tour-operators itinerary because of its uniqueness.

The timeworn structures and walls within the temple complex are exquisitely contrasted by the manicured green lawns and tropical gardens. Shrine bases and white sandstone walls are covered in arrays of carvings, inspired by the great Hindu epics with a mixture of fables and legends, such as serpents, menacing demons and guardians. The stone staircases and temple gates of Pura Beji Temple also feature intact statues. It is a great stopover for art buffs and architecture lovers. Roaming through the whole complex can easily take up an hour.

The name ‘beji’ in the local tongue signifies purification by way of holy water, and it so happens that the Pura Beji Temple was built over a well. Revered by local farmers as a ‘pura subak’ or Balinese collective irrigation temple that worships the rice and fertility goddess Dewi Sri, the temple also features a bit of anachronism: two statues of Dutch musicians, each holding a guitar and a rebab. These may have been added later in time, as with the motifs found at Pura Meduwe Karang temple, further west in the village of Kubutambahan.

Public Facilities

  • Parking Area
  • Public Toilet